Sunday, March 6, 2016

West Germany’s South American Tour of 1982

In March 1982, the West German National Team embarked on a Tour of South America, its first since 1977.
The Germans had qualified for the 1982 World Cup in Spain with a perfect record of 8 wins out of 8 in their group. They were viewed as the best team in Europe and were led by Double Ballon d’Or winner Karl-Heinz Rummenigge.
The tour was beneficial for the Germans to test themselves against their biggest rivals from the South American continent: Brazil and defending World Cup Champions of Argentina.
West German Manager Juup Derwall virtually selected his strongest squad with experimentation not in his mind.
However, after selecting his squad, he had the misfortune of losing Team Captain Rummenigge, who was injured with Bayern Munich in their Champions Cup Quarterfinals vs. Romania’s Universitatea Craiova.
Other missing players included SV Hamburg midfielder Felix Magath, Wilfried Hannes and Karl Allgöwer. Another missing key player was the Barcelona based Bernd Schuster. He had left the National team after a dispute and his future with the National team was still in doubt.
The Germans’ first test was against the attractive Brazil side of Tele Santana at Maracana on March 21st.
Brazil themselves were missing their Captain Socrates and Toninho Cerezo through injury.
In addition, Reinaldo, Serginho, Ze Sergio, Edevaldo and Batista were unavailable, not to mention Brazilians overseas (Falcao at AS Roma and Dirceu at Atletico Madrid).
These absences enabled rare starts for Adilio, Careca, Vitor and Mario Sergio. In fact Adilio and Antonio Careca were making their debuts for Brazil.
The original match referee was the Portuguese Antonio Garrido, however he was replaced by Spain’s Augusto Lamo Castillo following the Germans’ protests that Garrido spoke the same language as the opponents.

Photo From: Onze, Issue 76, April 1982
(Wolfgang Dremmler and Adilio, March 21, 1982, Brazil 1-West Germany 0)

Lothar Matthaus on his 21st Birthday earned a rare start. His task was to mark Zico.
The Germans had arrived the day before the match, which explained why Brazil were better and livelier. Their performance improved in the second half despite visibly missing the key absences.


Photo From: France Football, Issue 1877, March 30, 1982
(Zico, March 21, 1982, Brazil 1-West Germany 0)

Photo From: France Football, Issue 1877, March 30, 1982
(Mario Sergio between Paul Breitner and Manfred Kaltz, March 21, 1982, Brazil 1-West Germany 0)

The Germans were more cautious and defensive. Stilieke was the best German on the field according to many, while Matthaus and Hansi Muller also held their own.
Zico was well contained by Matthaus throughout the match and did not have his usual impact.


Photo From: Onze, Issue 76, April 1982
(March 21, 1982, Brazil 1-West Germany 0)

Photo From: Onze, Issue 76, April 1982
(Antonio Careca and Uli Stilieke, March 21, 1982, Brazil 1-West Germany 0)

The Germans suffered a blow as early as the 13th minute, when striker Klaus Fischer was injured and had to be replaced by Horst Hrubesch. Fischer’s tour was over after less than 15 minutes of action. Hrubesch had two good chances in the match but failed to open his account.
Near the closing stages of the match, Brazil finally broke through and opened the score.
Junior scored after a one-two with Adilio from the left side.

Photo From: Chronik des deutschen fussballs, 2005
(Harald Schumacher after Junior’s goal, March 21, 1982, Brazil 1-West Germany 0)

West German substitutes Mill and Engels made their debuts for the National team near the end of the match.
In the last minute the Germans were close to scoring, but Valdir Peres stopped Forster’s attempt.


Photo From: EL GRAFICO Nº 3259 (1983)
(March 21, 1982, Brazil 1-West Germany 0)

Photo From: EL GRAFICO Nº 3259 (1983)
(March 21, 1982, Brazil 1-West Germany 0)

Despite the defeat the Germans were satisfied with the overall display against their toughest rivals.
Three days later they faced Argentina at River Plate’s El Monumental stadium.
The Germans virtually started with the same lineup as Brazil, except this time Hrubesch started in place of the injured Fischer.

Photo From: (Magazine Source unknown) / Contribution From a blog viewer (special thanks to Daniel Antonio Escobar Riquelme)
(West Germany squad, Top, left to right:  Ulrich Stielike,  Horst Hrubesch, Hans-Peter Briegel,  Paul Breitner,  Harald Anton ‘Toni’ Schumacher, Manfred Kaltz  Bottom, left to right: Hans Peter ‘Hansi’ Müller, Pierre Littbarski, Lothar Herbert Matthäus, Wolfgang Dremmler, Karlheinz Förster ,  March 24, 1982, Argentina 1-West Germany 1)

The Argentines were missing the foreign-based duo of Osvaldo Ardiles and Daniel Bertoni.
They also had rule out goalkeeper Ubaldo Fillol due to food poisoning. Initially 
There was a fear that he may have contracted Hepatitis.
The entire team was medically checked the morning of match.
Hector Baley replaced Fillol in the net, and Ardiles’ absence allowed Barbas to start.
This time Lothar Matthaus was tasked with marking Diego Maradona and once again he accomplished his mission.


Photo From: Onze, Issue 76, April 1982
(March 24, 1982, Argentina 1-West Germany 1)

Photo From: Onze, Issue 76, April 1982
(Hans-Peter Briegel and Juan Barbas, March 24, 1982, Argentina 1-West Germany 1)

Maradona was marked out of the game and had a disappointing evening along with teammate Mario Kempes.
The Argentines had actually started better, but had faded as the first half had progressed. The Germans were better than the match with Brazil and were determined not to lose two matches in a row.


Photo From: World Soccer , May 1982
(Paul Breitner and Gabriel calderon, March 24, 1982, Argentina 1-West Germany 1)

Photo From: EL GRAFICO Nº 3260 (1984)
(Ramon Diaz and Karlheinz Foerster, March 24, 1982, Argentina 1-West Germany 1)

The Germans went ahead first in the opening half. In the 33rd minute, Hansi Muller took a corner from the left side that was headed across to the right side by Hrubesch. The ball fell perfectly for Dremmler who slammed it home with an angled shot.


Photo From: Onze, Issue 76, April 1982
(Diego Maradona and Manfred Kaltz, March 24, 1982, Argentina 1-West Germany 1)

Their hosts tied up midway into the second half. Gabriel Calderon from the left side did a one-two with Maradona and shot past Schumacher.
Immediately, after Argentina’s goal, the Germans made a double substitution.
A tired Breitner was taken off as Gallego and Calderon had constantly fouled him.
Breitner had a fine match, along with once again Stilieke and Matthaus. For the Argentineans striker Ramon Diaz and back up goalkeeper Baley had stood out.


Photo From: Chronik des deutschen fussballs, 2005
(Wolfgang Dremmler’s goal, March 24, 1982, Argentina 1-West Germany 1)

Photo From: World Soccer, June 1982
(Argentina squad, March 24, 1982, Argentina 1-West Germany 1)

The West Germany ended their tour on a high note as they had as held Argentina at bay for long periods.
Lothar Matthaus won his spot for the World Cup Finals squad with this tour. Horst Hrubesch did not capitalize on the chance and playing offered to him. He certainly did not do enough to dislodge Fischer as starting striker.
The importance of Stilieke was also visible for all to see.


Photo From: EL GRAFICO Nº 3260 (1984)
(Wolfgang Dremmler’s goal, March 24, 1982, Argentina 1-West Germany 1)

Photo From: EL GRAFICO Nº 3260 (1984)
(Wolfgang Dremmler’s goal, March 24, 1982, Argentina 1-West Germany 1)

However, the absence of Captain Karl-Heinz Rummenigge showed his importance he to the team. Most of Germany’s attacking initiative was missing without him. A fit Rummenigge was a must for the Germans to have any chance in Spain.
Nevertheless, the Germans were satisfied with this tour and believed they could improve further in three months time for the World Cup Finals.


Photo From: EL GRAFICO Nº 3260 (1984)
(Sequence of Gabriel Calderon’s equalizer, March 24, 1982, Argentina 1-West Germany 1)

Photo From: EL GRAFICO Nº 3260 (1984)
(Final Sequence of Gabriel Calderon’s equalizer, March 24, 1982, Argentina 1-West Germany 1)


The selected squad for the South American Tour:
Goalkeepers:
Squad
Harald Anton ‘Toni’ Schumacher (1. Fußball-Club Köln 01/07 e.V.)
Bernd Franke (Braunschweiger Turn- und Sportverein Eintracht von 1895 e.V.)  Eike Immel (Ballspielverein Borussia Dortmund 1909 e.V)

Defenders:
Manfred Kaltz (Hamburger Sport-Verein e.V.) (captain in Rumemnigge’s absence)
Ulrich Stielike (Real Madrid Club de Fútbol / Spain)
Karlheinz Förster (Verein für Bewegungspiele Stuttgart 1893 e.V.)
Hans-Peter Briegel (1.Fußball-Club e.V. Kaiserslautern) 
Bernd Förster (Verein für Bewegungspiele Stuttgart 1893 e.V.)

Midfielders:
Wolfgang Dremmler (Fußball-Club Bayern München e.V.)
Paul Breitner (Fußball-Club Bayern München e.V.)
Hans Peter ‘Hansi’ Müller (Verein für Bewegungspiele Stuttgart 1893 e.V.)
Lothar Matthäus (Borussia Verein für Leibesübungen 1900 e.V. Mönchengladbach)
Stefan Engels (1. Fußball-Club Köln 01/07 e.V.)   

Strikers:
Pierre Littbarski (1. Fußball-Club Köln 01/07 e.V.)
Horst Hrubesch (Hamburger Sport-Verein e.V.)
Klaus Fischer (1. Fußball-Club Köln 01/07 e.V.)
Frank Mill (Borussia Verein für Leibesübungen 1900 e.V. Mönchengladbach)
Karl-Heinz Rummenigge (captain) (Fußball-Club Bayern München e.V.) (injured)

Coach: Josef ‘Jupp’ Derwall

The Matches on Tour:

March 21, 1982- Rio de Janeiro - Estádio do Maracanã- Estádio Mário Filho   
Referee:  Augusto Lamo Castillo (Spain)
Brazil 1-West Germany 0 (Junior 83)
Brazil: 1- Valdir Peres, 2-Leandro, 3-Oscar, 4-Luizinho, 6-Junior, 5-Vitor, 8-Adilio, 10-Zico (captain), 7-Paulo Isidoro, 9-Careca, 11-Mario Sergio (19-Eder 70th )
Coach: Telê Santana
Other Subs: Paulo Sergio, Perivaldo, Juninho, Edinho, Pedrinho, Renato, Roberto Dinamite

West Germany: 1-Harald Anton ‘Toni’ Schumacher, 2-Manfred Kaltz (Captain), 3-Ulrich Stielike, 4-Karlheinz Förster, 5- Hans-Peter Briegel, 6-Wolfgang Dremmler, 8-Paul Breitner, 10- Lothar Matthäus, 7-Pierre Littbarski (16-Frank Mill 85th ), 9-Klaus Fischer (15-Horst Hrubesch 13th ), 11-Hans Peter ‘Hansi’ Müller (14-Stefan Engels 81st )
Coach: Josef ‘Jupp’ Derwall

Other Subs: Bernd Franke , Bernd Forster




March 24, 1982- Buenos Aires -Antonio Vespuci Alberti (El Monumental) (River Plate)
Referee:  José Luis Martínez Bazán (Uruguay)
Argentina 1-West Germany 1  (Gabriel Calderon 67 / Wolfgang Dremmler 33)
Argentina: 1-Hector Rodolfo Baley, 4-Jorge Mario Olguín, 2-Luis Adolfo Galván, 6-Daniel Alberto Passarella (captain), 3-Alberto César Tarantini, 8-Juan Alberto Barbas, 5-Américo Rubén Gallego, 10-Diego Armando Maradona, 7-Gabriel Humberto Calderon, 9-Ramon Angel Diaz, 11-Mario Alberto Kempes (14-Patricio Jose Hernandez 78th )
Coach: Cesar Luis Menotti
Booked: Jorge Olguin
Other Subs: Raul de la cruz Chaparro, Enzo Hector Trossero, Nery Alberto Pumpido, Jose Daniel Van Tuyne, Julio Jorge Olarticoechea, Jose Daniel Valencia

West Germany : 1-Harald Anton ‘Toni’ Schumacher, 2-Manfred Kaltz (Captain), 3-Ulrich Stielike, 4-Karlheinz Förster, 5-Hans-Peter Briegel, 6-Wolfgang Dremmler, 7-Lothar Matthäus, 8-Paul Breitner (13-Bernd Förster 68th ), 10-Hans Peter ‘Hansi’ Müller, 11-Pierre Littbarski (15-Frank Mill 68th), 9-Horst Hrubesch (14-Stefan Engels 78th)
Coach: Josef ‘Jupp’ Derwall
Booked: Horst Hrubrsch, Uli Stielike
Other Subs: Eike Immel




References:
Chronik des deutschen fussballs, 2005
EL GRAFICO Nº 3259 (1982)  (By Jose Luis Barrio)
EL GRAFICO Nº 3260 (1988) (By Juna Jose Panno)
France Football, Issue 1876, March 23, 1982 (‘Un But Venu de Loin’ By Gerard Ejnes)
France Football, Issue 1877, March 30, 1982 (‘Kempes et Maradona ou Kempes ou Maradona? By Gerard Ejnes)
Onze, Issue 76, April 1982 (‘Samba Sur Maracana’  By Francis Huertas)
Onze, Issue 76, April 1982 (‘Rencontre au Sommet’  By Francis Huertas)
World Soccer , May 1982

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  3. Continental zones

    To see the dates and results of the qualification rounds for each continental zone, click on the following articles:

    Europe (UEFA)
    Group 1 – Poland qualified. Belgium advanced to the UEFA play-offs.
    Group 2 – West Germany and Portugal qualified.
    Group 3 – England and Northern Ireland qualified.
    Group 4 – France and Bulgaria qualified.
    Group 5 – Hungary qualified. Netherlands advanced to the UEFA play-offs.
    Group 6 – Denmark and USSR qualified.
    Group 7 – Spain qualified. Scotland advanced to the UEFA–OFC intercontinental play-off.
    Play-offs – Belgium qualified over Netherlands.
    South America (CONMEBOL)
    Group 1 – Argentina qualified. Peru and Colombia advanced to the CONMEBOL play-offs.
    Group 2 – Uruguay qualified. Chile advanced to the CONMEBOL play-offs.
    Group 3 – Brazil qualified. Paraguay advanced to the CONMEBOL play-offs.
    Play-offs – Paraguay qualified over Chile, Colombia and Peru.
    North America (CONCACAF)
    Canada qualified.
    Africa (CAF)
    Algeria and Morocco qualified.
    Asia (AFC)
    Iraq and Korea Republic qualified.
    Oceania (OFC)
    Australia advanced to the UEFA–OFC intercontinental play-off

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    1. A total of 121 teams entered the 1986 FIFA World Cup qualification rounds, competing for a total of 24 spots in the final tournament. Mexico, as the hosts, and Italy, as the defending champions, qualified automatically, leaving 22 spots open for competition. The draw took place on 7 December 1983 at Zürich, Switzerland.

      The 24 spots available in the 1986 World Cup would be distributed among the continental zones as follows:

      Europe (UEFA): 13.5 places, 1 of them went to automatic qualifier Italy, while the other 12.5 places were contested by 32 teams. The winner of the 0.5 place would advance to the intercontinental play-offs (against a team from OFC).
      South America (CONMEBOL): 4 places, contested by 10 teams.
      North, Central America and Caribbean (CONCACAF): 2 places, 1 of them went to automatic qualifier Mexico, while the other 1 place was contested by 17 teams.
      Africa (CAF): 2 places, contested by 29 teams.
      Asia (AFC): 2 places, contested by 27 teams.
      Oceania (OFC): 0.5 place, contested by 4 teams (including Israel and Chinese Taipei). The winner of the 0.5 place would advance to the intercontinental play-offs (against a team from UEFA).
      A total of 110 teams played at least one qualifying match. A total of 308 qualifying matches were played, and 801 goals were scored (an average of 2.60 per match).

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